National Partnership for Women & Families

Research Library: Paid Sick Days

Doing some policy research? Need some background materials? You've come to the right place.

Note: Documents in the library are organized by issue area — and PDFs require Adobe Reader (free download/upgrade available).

 

 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

In 2008, workers and advocates in Milwaukee achieved a great victory when nearly 70 percent of voters in the city voted for a paid sick days standard. Unfortunately, in 2011, statewide legislation preempted the voter-supported law and prevented its implementation.


Minnesota

More than 845,000 Minnesota workers - about 41 percent of the state's private-sector workforce - are not able to take a paid sick day when they are ill.


New Jersey

More than 1.2 million New Jersey workers - about 38 percent of the state's private-sector workforce - are not able to take a paid sick day when they are ill.


New York, New York

An estimated 1.65 to 1.85 million New York City workers do not have access to paid sick days.


New York

More than 2.5 million New York workers - about 38 percent of the state's private-sector workforce - are not able to take a paid sick day when they are ill.


North Carolina

More than 1,300,000 North Carolina workers - about 44 percent of the state's private-sector workforce - are not able to take a paid sick day when they are ill.


Oregon

More than 490,000 Oregon workers - about 40 percent of the state's private sector workforce - are not able to take a paid sick day when they are ill.


Orlando, Florida

More than 255,000 workers in Orange County, where Orlando is located - about 46 percent of the county's private sector workforce - do not have paid sick days.


Pennsylvania

More than 1.8 million Pennsylvania workers - about 39 percent of the state's private-sector workforce - are not able to take a paid sick day when they are ill.


Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

More than 210,000 Philadelphia workers are not able to take an earned sick day when they are ill.


Seattle, Washington

In September 2011, the Seattle City Council passed and Mayor Michael McGinn signed the city's paid sick days law, making paid sick days available to more than 150,000 workers in Seattle who previously had none.


Vermont

More than 85,000 Vermont workers - about 38 percent of the state's private-sector workforce - are not able to take a paid sick day when they are ill.


Washington, D.C.

Although Washington, D.C., was the second U.S. city to enact a paid sick days law, certain workers - including tipped restaurant workers - are excluded from coverage.


Washington

More than 865,000 Washington workers - about 39 percent of the state's private-sector workforce - are not able to take a paid sick day when they are ill.


Paid Sick Days Testimony - March 1, 2011

Like many across the nation, Connecticut's working families are struggling harder than ever to make ends meet. For workers without paid sick days, a bad case of the flu or a child's fever can mean the loss of a much-needed paycheck or even a job.


Paid Sick Days Memo

On July 5th, 2011, Connecticut became the first state to pass a law giving many workers the right to earn paid sick days.


Statements from Coalition Leaders on Paid Sick Days

Reflecting the breadth of support for paid sick days, leaders of the following organizations have spoken out on Connecticut becoming the first state in the nation to pass paid sick days legislation.


Paid Sick Days Survey

The following results are from a survey given to 500 Connecticut voters in response to paid sick days.


Paid Sick Days: Attitudes and Experiences

Except in a few localities, employers are not required by law to provide paid sick days for workers. But most Americans believe that paid sick days should be a worker's right guaranteed by the government.


Paid Sick Leave Does Not Harm Business Growth or Job Growth

A bill in the New York City Council guaranteeing workers the right to earn paid sick leave is closely modeled on a law enacted by San Francisco in 2007.


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