National Partnership for Women & Families

Research Library: FMLA

Doing some policy research? Need some background materials? You've come to the right place.

Note: Documents in the library are organized by issue area — and PDFs require Adobe Reader (free download/upgrade available).

 

 

Executive Summary of Alito Report: Tipping the Balance

That is why the National Partnership for Women & Families looked closely at Judge Alito’s available record, examining his writings and opinions on a range of issues from employment to reproductive rights to affirmative action, and more.


Who's the Judge: Why Women Should Care About Judicial Appointments

Judges are charged with the responsibility to interpret and help administer our nation’s laws. Judges’ decisions govern our lives in many areas, such as the question of when women may bring suit to challenge and change unequal pay practices, and whether health plans and providers impermissibly discriminate against women when they refuse to cover or offer certain reproductive health services.


Family Friendly Workplace Policies Must Include Grandparents

Grandparents are the glue that holds many families together - yet our workplace laws don't honor their critical role.


The Family and Medical Leave Act at 20: 100 Million Reasons to Celebrate and Move Forward

2013 is the 20th anniversary of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) – the first and only national law that enables workers to care for themselves and their loved ones without jeopardizing their jobs or economic security.


Statement of Opposition on the Nomination of William Pryor

The National Partnership for Women & Families opposes the nomination of William Pryor to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit.


Grandparent's Day 2010: Work-Family Policies Must Include Grandparents

Grandparents are the glue that holds many families together—yet our workplace laws don't honor their critical role.


Work and Family Policy Options for Advocates and Legislators

Workers should not have to choose between a paycheck, their job, and their own health or the health of their families. Yet, because of the lack of policies that help workers meet their family responsibilities, many workers face this choice every day.


112th Congress: Work and Family Agenda

Every day, working women and men in the United States struggle to meet the dual demands of work and family because their workplaces are without basic family friendly policies. It is long past time for workplaces to reflect the needs of 21st century working families, which for many include the ability to care for children, family members and elderly relatives while also being productive, responsible employees.


Paid Family and Medical Leave: Securing Financial Stability and Good Health for Working Families

Just 11 percent of the workforce has access to paid family leave through their employers, and fewer than 40 percent of workers have access to personal medical leave through an employer’s temporary disability insurance program.


Detours on the Road to Employment: Obstacles Facing Low Income Women

For many women, the path to finding and keeping a job with decent wages and advancement opportunities is strewn with obstacles — from lack of adequate child care, to juggling work and family responsibilities, to dealing with on-the-job discrimination.


Policy Matters: Public Policy, Paid Leave for New Parents, and Economic Security for U.S. Workers

A rich and growing literature attests to the benefits that accrue to workers, families, businesses, and the public when workers have access to paid leave to care for a new child. Such benefits include lower likelihood of premature birth, improvements in breastfeeding establishment and duration, and higher likelihood of obtaining well‐baby care.


Pay Matters: The Positive Economic Impact of Paid Family Leave for Families, Businesses and the Public

Changes in the demographic composition of the U.S. workforce mean that more women and men are actively engaging in both paid work and care work. As of 2010, the percentage of children who had both parents (in married‐couple families), or their only parent, in the labor force reached 72.3%, an increase of 13 percentage points since the mid‐1980s.


The Work, Family, and Equity Index: Where Does the United States Stand Globally?

When it comes to ensuring decent working conditions for families, the latest research shows many U.S. public policies still lag dramatically behind all high-income countries, as well as many middle- and low-income countries.

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