National Partnership for Women & Families

Research Library: Other

Doing some policy research? Need some background materials? You've come to the right place.

Note: Documents in the library are organized by issue area — and PDFs require Adobe Reader (free download/upgrade available).

 

 

Why the Affordable Care Act Matters for Women: Improving Health Coverage for Lower-Income Women

The high cost of health care places a particular burden on lower-income women who need health services but often struggle to pay premiums and out-of-pocket costs. The problem has been exacerbated because many insurers charge women higher rates simply because of their gender, thereby putting health coverage out of reach—especially for many lower-income women.


Why the Affordable Care Act Matters for Women: Improving Health Care for Older Women

Access to affordable, quality health care is central to older women’s quality of life and economic security. The good news is that if you are a woman 65 years of age or older, you have a lot to gain from the Affordable Care Act (ACA).


Why the Affordable Care Act Matters for Women: Restrictions on Abortion Coverage

Abortion is one of the most common medical procedures for women; an estimated one in three women will have an abortion in her lifetime. The majority of women who have abortions already have at least one child and many list the need to care for their children as a primary reason not to have another.


Why the Affordable Care Act Matters for Women: Summary of Key Provisions

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is the greatest advance for women’s health in a generation. Improving health care has long been a priority for women, reflecting their experiences as patients, mothers, and caregivers.


Standing Up for Women & Families in 2014

In 2014, the National Partnership for Women & Families is urging members of Congress to stand up for women and families by supporting the following legislative agenda.


HCR Health Reform is Making a Difference in Women

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is the greatest advance for women’s health in a generation. It’s already improving the lives of millions of women and families, and will get even better with time.


Expecting Better: A State-by-State Analysis of Laws That Help New Parents (2012)

Across the political spectrum, more of our nation’s leaders acknowledge that 21st century families face significant challenges in meeting their responsibilities at home and on the job.


Medicare: Providing Critical Support for America's Older Women

Older women rely on Medicare every day for affordable, quality health care. More than half of the 48.7 million Medicare beneficiaries are women.


Medicare: Providing Critical Support for America’s Older Women

Older women rely on Medicare every day for affordable, quality health care. More than half of the 48.7 million Medicare beneficiaries are women. Women also constitute 70 percent of the oldest Medicare beneficiaries – those 85 years or older.


Medicaid Primer: Ensuring Basic Health Care for Millions of Women and Children

Medicaid provides critical health care for millions of lower income women and children who otherwise would be uninsured. At all ages, women and girls make up the majority of enrollees in Medicaid.


Medicaid Block Grants/Caps Will Hurt Women and Families

Medicaid, the nation’s principal safety net health insurance program, provides critical health care for millions of lower income women, including many older women and women with disabilities.


CMS Rule on Medicare Shared Savings Program: Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) (June 2011)

Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) are a potentially innovative health care delivery model that could provide an opportunity to improve the quality of our healthcare system by delivering coordinated, patient- and family-centered care.


Coverage Statistics

Family economic insecurity is on the rise. Increasing numbers of women and families are losing employer-sponsored insurance and either going without insurance or enrolling in Medicaid.


Older Women Need ACA

Because women live longer, they make up more than half of the Medicare population and are more likely to have multiple chronic conditions. As both caregivers and patients, older women have borne the brunt of shortcomings in our health care system – high costs, poor quality, and fragmented, uncoordinated care.


Affordability

Women on average earn less than men and are more likely to live in poverty. Female households, which are on the rise, are especially at risk of of living in poverty. Many women also have caregiving responsibilities, which limit their time and ability to work outside the home and require in additional health care spending.


Letter in Opposition to H.R.2 (Repealing Health Reform), (January 2011)

I am writing to ask you to protect women and families in your district by opposing repeal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In recent years, my colleagues and I have talked to countless women across this country who struggle mightily in a health care system fraught with delays, discrimination, and denials of care.


Building Better Workplaces for Family Caregivers

Millions of Americans who are elderly, disabled, or chronically ill rely on family caregivers, as do our nation's children. Many of these family caregivers are struggling to manage both their caregiving responsibilities and the jobs they need to support their families.


Meaningful Use Incentive Program Structure

The HITECH Act provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (“ARRA”) established Medicare and Medicaid incentive payments to providers who are meaningful users of certified Electronic Health Record (EHR) technology.


Final HHS Regulation Backgrounder

The Obama Administration has initiated the process to rescind a harmful regulation issued by the Department of Health and Human Services – one of the infamous ‘midnight regulations’- that became effective on the last day of the Bush Administration. The HHS regulation threatens to dramatically undermine access to a broad range of health information and services by essentially allowing health care workers and institutions an unfettered ability to refuse to provide health care services, information, and referrals that offend their religious beliefs or moral convictions.


On the Road to Recovery: Reproductive Health Legislative, Regulatory and Political Highlights of 2008

In 2008, virtually all reproductive health debates and decisions in the legislative and policy arenas took place against the backdrop of one of the most unforgettable presidential campaigns in history – one in which voters could not have been presented with a starker choice between candidates on reproductive health policy. When the dust had settled, the country had elected a pro-choice, pro-prevention President with a strong track record of support for women’s reproductive health.


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