National Partnership for Women & Families

Research Library

Doing some policy research? Need some background materials? You've come to the right place.

Note: Documents in the library are organized by issue area — and PDFs require Adobe Reader (free download/upgrade available).

 

 

San Francisco Women and the Wage Gap

In the San Francisco metro area, on average, a woman who holds a full-time job is paid $52,301 per year while a man who holds a full-time job is paid $62,269 per year. This means that women in the San Francisco area are paid 84 cents for every dollar paid to men in the area, amounting to a yearly gap of $9,968 between men and women who work full time.


Improving Specialty Care Coordination

People who need specialists to evaluate or treat serious illnesses often do not get the best quality care because of poor coordination with the primary care providers who know them best. Specialists in many cases do not know about other conditions or preferences people have that may affect specialty care.


State Paid Leave Fund Letter

We, the undersigned organizations, express our strong support for an appropriation of $23 million for the State Paid Leave Fund within the U.S. Department of Labor. Grants made from this fund will assist states in planning, startup and outreach activities related to paid family and medical leave programs.


Working Women and Alaska’s Wage Gap

In Alaska, the median pay for a woman working full time, year round is $42,376 per year, while the median yearly pay for a man is $56,643. This means that women are paid 75 cents for every dollar paid to men, amounting to a yearly gap of $14,267 between full-time working men and women in the state.


Rhode Island Women and the Wage Gap

In Rhode Island, on average, a woman who holds a full-time job is paid $41,412 per year while a man who holds a full-time job is paid $48,842 per year. This means that women in Rhode Island are paid 85 cents for every dollar paid to men, amounting to a yearly gap of $7,430 between men and women who work full time in the state.


Washington

More than 865,000 Washington workers — about 39 percent of the state’s private-sector workforce — are not able to take a paid sick day when they are ill.


Why Medicare Matters for Women in Georgia

Medicare is a linchpin of financial and health security for millions of older women – including more than 585,000 older women in Georgia – guaranteeing them coverage for affordable, quality health care.


Family Friendly America: Wisconsin

Wisconsin workers need public policies that allow them to better manage the dual demands of work and family. Family friendly workplace laws help workers maintain their economic security when they give birth, adopt, raise children or grandchildren, deal with illness, and care for parents, grandparents, spouses or partners.


Overview of Judge Terrence Boyle's Judicial Record

The National Partnership for Women & Families strongly opposes the nomination of Judge Terrence Boyle to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit.


Working Women and Maine’s Wage Gap

In Maine, the median pay for a woman working full time, year round is $33,873 per year, while the median yearly pay for a man is $43,029. This means that women are paid 79 cents for every dollar paid to men, amounting to a yearly gap of $9,156 between full-time working men and women in the state.


Working Women and Wisconsin’s Wage Gap

In Wisconsin, the median pay for a woman working full time, year round is $35,490 per year, while the median yearly pay for a man is $45,523. This means that women are paid 78 cents for every dollar paid to men, amounting to a yearly gap of $10,033 between full-time working men and women in the state.


Family Friendly America: Colorado

Colorado workers need public policies that allow them to better manage the dual demands of work and family. Family friendly workplace laws help workers maintain their economic security when they give birth, adopt, raise children or grandchildren, deal with illness, and care for parents, grandparents, spouses or partners.


America’s Working Parents Deserve Paid Family Leave

Too many working parents are left to struggle on their own when a new child arrives or a family member is taken ill because they do not have the security of job-protected, paid time away from work. It is time for Congress to take action to support working families!


Oklahoma City Women and the Wage Gap

In the Oklahoma City metro area, on average, a woman who holds a full-time job is paid $32,573 per year while a man who holds a full-time job is paid $42,409 per year. This means that women in the Oklahoma City area are paid 77 cents for every dollar paid to men in the area, amounting to a yearly gap of $9,836 between men and women who work full time.


Working Women and Indiana’s Wage Gap

In Indiana, the median pay for a woman working full time, year round is $32,221 per year, while the median yearly pay for a man is $44,851. This means that women are paid 72 cents for every dollar paid to men, amounting to a yearly gap of $12,630 between full-time working men and women in the state.


Family Friendly America: Kansas

Kansas workers need public policies that allow them to better manage the dual demands of work and family. Family friendly workplace laws help workers maintain their economic security when they give birth, adopt, raise children or grandchildren, deal with illness, and care for parents, grandparents, spouses or partners.


Why Medicare Matters for Women in New Jersey

Medicare is a linchpin of financial and health security for millions of older women – including more than 750,000 older women in New Jersey – guaranteeing them coverage for affordable, quality health care.


Bypassing Justice: Wyoming


D.C. Women and the Wage Gap

In the D.C. metro area, on average, a woman who holds a full-time job is paid $55,688 per year while a man who holds a full-time job is paid $68,034 per year. This means that women in the D.C. area are paid 82 cents for every dollar paid to men in the area, amounting to a yearly gap of $12,346 between men and women who work full time.


Seattle, Washington

In September 2011, the Seattle City Council passed and Mayor Michael McGinn signed the city’s paid sick days law, making paid sick days available to more than 150,000 workers in Seattle who previously had none.


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