National Partnership for Women & Families

Research Library:

Doing some policy research? Need some background materials? You've come to the right place.

Note: Documents in the library are organized by issue area — and PDFs require Adobe Reader (free download/upgrade available).

 

 

Economic Security Issues for Women and Families on 2014 Midterm Election Campaign Websites

A memo summarizing the results of the National Partnership’s analysis of the campaign websites of all 2014 general election candidates for governor, U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives.


Why the Affordable Care Act Matters For Women: Maintaining Your Health Coverage

Thanks to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), quality health insurance is now more accessible to women and families. More than eight million Americans have signed up for health coverage through health insurance marketplaces since October 2013.


Increasing Access to Health Care for Women and Families: Medicaid Expansion

Prior to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the cost of health insurance placed a particular burden on lower-income women who needed health care services but often struggled to pay insurance premiums and the out-of-pocket costs of care.


State and Local Action on Paid Sick Days

Detailed summaries of state and local paid sick days campaigns, activity and legislation.


Paid Leave Works in California, New Jersey and Rhode Island

FACT SHEET | Studies of the nation's three paid family leave programs demonstrate how well paid leave policies work for workers, families and businesses.


Paid Sick Days Statutes

CHART | A detailed summary of existing paid sick days laws.


Not Enough Family Friendly Policies: High Stakes for Women and Families

FACT SHEET | Women make up nearly half of the U.S. workforce and are the primary or co-breadwinners in two-thirds of families. But our nation’s public policies don’t reflect this reality.


America’s Women and the Wage Gap

FACT SHEET | Nationally, on average, a woman who holds a full-time, year-round job is paid $39,157 per year while a man who holds a full-time, year-round job is paid $50,033 per year. This means that, overall, women in the United States are paid 78 cents for every dollar paid to men.


What Health IT Means For Women

On average, women use the health care system to a greater extent than men, and thus stand to benefit more from greater access to their own health information and electronic tools that help them manage their health and coordinate their care.


Amicus Brief: Peggy Young v. United Parcel Service, Inc.

The amici argue that denying pregnant workers job modifications that are granted to others similar in their ability or inability violates the Pregnancy Discrimination Act and contravenes sound health, economic and social policy.


Paid Sick Days: Low Cost, High Reward for Workers, Families and Communities

A growing body of evidence assessing existing laws shows that paid sick days make business and economic sense.


Why the Affordable Care Act Matters for Women: Premium and Cost-Sharing Assistance

Health insurance is critical to making health care services accessible to women and families, yet the cost of coverage can put it out of reach for many, especially those who do not receive insurance from their employers.


Why the Affordable Care Act Matters for Women: Improving Health Coverage for Women of Color

Women of color, many of whom have unique health issues or are disproportionately underserved by the current health-care system, have much to gain under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).


Why the Affordable Care Act Matters for Women: Improving Health Coverage for Lower-Income Women

The high cost of health care places a particular burden on lower-income women who need health services but often struggle to pay premiums and out-of-pocket costs. The problem has been exacerbated because many insurers charge women higher rates simply because of their gender, thereby putting health coverage out of reach—especially for many lower-income women.


Why the Affordable Care Act Matters for Women: Improving Health Care for Older Women

Access to affordable, quality health care is central to older women’s quality of life and economic security. The good news is that if you are a woman 65 years of age or older, you have a lot to gain from the Affordable Care Act (ACA).


Why the Affordable Care Act Matters for Women: Preserving Access to Women’s Health Clinics

Today, many uninsured or underinsured Americans receive their care from publicly funded clinics and health providers across the country known as essential community providers (ECPs). Many of these providers do not require insurance or any payment.


Health Information Technology: The Foundation for Health Reform

Health information technology (health IT) is a foundational component of a more patient-centered, effective and efficient health care system where women and their health care providers have access to the information they need anytime, anywhere.


Why the Affordable Care Act Matters for Women: Health Insurance Coverage for Lower- and Moderate-Income Pregnant Women

Many women of childbearing age will gain access to affordable health insurance for the first time as a result of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Thanks to the ACA, eligibility for Medicaid will be expanded and more affordable health insurance plans will be offered to individuals in state-based health insurance marketplaces.


Why the Affordable Care Act Matters for Women: The Requirement to Have Health Insurance

In 2014, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will make it easier for millions of women to find and enroll in a more affordable health plan that best meets their needs and the needs of their families.


Why the Affordable Care Act Matters for Women: Restrictions on Abortion Coverage

Abortion is one of the most common medical procedures for women; an estimated one in three women will have an abortion in her lifetime. The majority of women who have abortions already have at least one child and many list the need to care for their children as a primary reason not to have another.


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